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hours of service reform

Undoubtedly, Hours of Service (HOS) is one of the most pressing issues in the trucking industry today. However, with the hard work and engagement of drivers, industry stakeholders, and trade groups/associations the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is moving forward with the rulemaking process to change the existing HOS. It is vital that drivers and stakeholders understand these proposed changes so they can be their own best advocate and make the most effective public comments possible. It is one of TruckerNation’s primary goals to remove any and all barriers that would prevent drivers and industry stakeholders from getting involved with this rulemaking and any others.

The FMCSA is proposing 5 changes to HOS. Those 5 changes are quickly summarized below:

  1. Under the proposed regulations CDL drivers who use this exemption would have a 14-hour duty day rather than a 12-hour duty day and be able to operate within 150 air miles rather than 100 air miles. Commonly referred to as the “local driver exemption”

  2. Under the proposed regulations a driver’s drive time AND on duty time would be extended by 2 hours. This would allow a driver to drive a total of 13 hours and have a total of 16 hours on duty if he/she experiences “adverse driving conditions”.

  3. Under the proposed regulations a 30-minute break is only required if a driver has driven for any consecutive 8 hours. Additionally, drivers may satisfy the 30-minute break requirement with on-duty not driving, sleeper berth, or off duty time.

  4. Under the proposed regulations drivers can pause their 14-hour clock by splitting their required 10-hour sleeper berth time. Drivers would be allowed to accumulate their 10-hour sleeper berth time by taking it in 2 periods (8/2, 2/8, 7/3 or 3/7). Neither period would count against a driver’s daily 14-hour clock. Commonly referred to as the “split sleeper” option.

  5. Under the proposed regulations drivers may pause their 14-hour clock one time by taking an off-duty break. This break can range anywhere between 30 minutes and 3 hours. If a driver uses this option to pause his/her 14-hour clock he/she is then required to take a consecutive 10 hour off duty break and his/her 14- hour clock may be extended for whatever the length of the break that was taken.

Click here to access TruckerNation’s complete HOS clarification document and learn more about each proposed change to HOS.

make a public comment on the proposed changes to hos t-o-d-a-y!!!

The HOS Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) is open for public comment NOW!!! YOU have the opportunity to have a direct impact on the proposed changes to HOS by making a public comment TODAY!!! You are not limited to the number of public comments you can make and all comments MUST BE RECEIVED by 11:59pm EST on October 7, 2019.

Click the button below to access TruckerNation’s Public Comments 101 document for HOS Reform. This document outlines each of the specific questions that FMCSA is asking on each of the 5 proposed changes to HOS. Answer one of the questions, answer a few of the questions, or answer none of the questions. The choice is yours. The most important thing is that you make a comment, leverage your voice, and be your own best advocate!

How to make a public comment

There are traditionally 5 ways to make a public comment. File a comment electronically, fax a comment, mail a comment, hand deliver a comment, or deliver a comment at a public listening session. The ‘Public Comments 101 - Hours of Service’ document linked above will walk you through, step-by-step, each way to make a public comment. If you still have questions or want to talk to someone at TruckerNation about making a public comment feel free to reach out to us on Facebook or at thetruckernation@gmail.com. Click the button below to access the federal docket and make a public comment.

Additional HOS Resources

Below you will find a few additional resources that TruckerNation has put together to assist drivers in understanding the proposed changes, namely the 30-minute break, split sleeper, and split duty.

Click HERE to watch a video where we discuss the 30 minute break and the split sleeper proposals

Click HERE to watch a video where we discuss the split duty proposal

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30 Minute Break Example 1

This example shows a driver taking a 30-minute break to fuel and logging it as on-duty not driving time. The driver takes this 30 minute break after 3 hours of consecutive driving driving but before 8 hours of consecutive driving. Therefore, the driver only has to take one 30-minute break during this duty period.

30 Minute Break - 1 break required after 8 cons. hours driving.jpeg

30 Minute Break Example 2

This example shows a driver taking a 30-minute break to check his/her load and logging it as on-duty not driving time. However, since the driver took this 30-minute break before 3 hours of consecutive driving and drives 8 consecutive hours later in the day, he/she would then be required to take an additional 30-minute break.

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30 Minute Break Example 3

This example shows a driver taking a 2 consecutive 15-minute breaks, one 15-minute period for fueling (logged as on-duty not driving) followed by a 15-minute period for eating (logged as off duty). Since the driver never drives for 8 consecutive hours he/she is only required to take one 30-minute break during this duty period.

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2/8 Split Sleeper Example

This example shows a driver opting to use the proposed split sleeper option by taking a 2/8 split. Since the driver never drives for 8 consecutive hours he/she would not be required to take a 30-minute break. Additionally, after the second split is completed the driver’s 14-hour clock resets.

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NOTE* A driver may also use this option by taking the 8 hour split first followed by the 2 hour split. Neither period would count against a driver’s daily 14-hour clock.

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3/7 Split Sleeper Example

This example shows a driver opting to use the proposed split sleeper option by taking a 3/7 split. Since the driver never drives for 8 consecutive hours he/she would not be required to take a 30-minute break. Additionally, after the second split is completed the driver’s 14-hour clock resets.

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NOTE* A driver may also use this option by taking the 7 hour split first followed by the 3 hour split. Neither period would count against a driver’s daily 14-hour clock.

Split Duty Example - Driver Exhausts 11 hr. Drive Time.jpeg

Split Duty Example 1

This example shows a driver using the proposed split duty option by taking a 3 hour off duty break. This break would pause the driver’s 14-hour clock and may extend the duty day by 3 hours. Because the driver drives for 8 consecutive hours he/she is required to take a 30 minute break which was taken while the driver is fueling and logged as on duty not driving. Because the driver chose to use the split duty option he/she is then required to take a 10-hour consecutive break. In this example the driver exhausts his/her 11-hour drive time despite having time left on his/her 14-hour clock.

*NOTE* The off duty period can range anywhere between 30 minutes and 3 hours.

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Split Duty Example 2

This example shows a driver using the proposed split duty option by taking a 3 hour off duty break. This break would pause the driver’s 14-hour clock and may extend the duty day by 3 hours. Because the driver never drives for 8 consecutive hours he/she is not required to take a 30 minute break. Because the driver chose to use the split duty option he/she is then required to take a 10-hour consecutive break. In this example the driver exhausts the 14-hour clock despite not driving 11 hours in the duty day.

*NOTE* The off duty period can range anywhere between 30 minutes and 3 hours.